Poor or not: The visible poverty and invisible poverty perspective. 2/2.

Invisble poverty and visible poverty *Canva image

Invisible poverty

Defining invisible poverty out of the first question: How poor is my world not how poor am I or how poor do I look.

The detail-emphasis approach/perspective brings in the “Why am I here logic” and it seems a question is a better starting point to handling anything happening in life than simply telling yourself “I am here now”. Now there are two questions on the same issue, poverty, and at the same individual level. Whether you like it or not you have to answer one among the two questions or both. Answering what can give a life a purpose and meaningful question (How poor is my world?) is ideal.

Looking for the first article? Poor or not? The visible poverty and invisible poverty perspective. 1/2

Answering the first question allows you to include yourself. You can not only become an individual in a lone world but part of a big world and room. The first question is:

How poor is the world (or that little room I am in)?

It’s very poor, even among the places it looks so damn rich. To admit that this world is very poor even in places and occasions it looks so rich, you are not given an option to see poverty. You simply feel it when there is any need or when you allow yourself to feel it only to be able to answer the first question. If we choose not to feel it we can’t get to see it through our eyes, since it’s invisible. Only to be addressing visible poverty (How poor am I?) and giving no answers to the first question.

Visible poverty gives you a choice to feel and also to see it, and even to think about it. So that it can be clearly visible to you and lure you to addressing it alone. And one day you will be “poor” for not having that fancy car. The race is always on.

Poverty or the other side of it were badly defined long ago and we can’t change it.

Those living under a dollar a day are poor, extremely poor. Thousands, millions and billions. We believe that the definition of poverty is all about how much you can buy or not buy. The definition is good but there is a fault it creates in us, and it is expected that someone who grew up in a disadvantaged position, a poor location in Africa, the city locations where disadvantaged populations and the traditionally left behind live, becomes suddenly the society’s noteworthy income-wise. Diamonds are bought countless times, instead of, for example, building a community library in that location or establishing a substantial business or even keeping the wealth in his hands. Yeah, it may be better for your future to keep it to yourself than to plunder it.

We can see that your wedding ring is the cheapest. That you don’t have a private jet or you have it. But what we can’t see is I am the fifth person to reach the university in my village since the beginning of college times in my country. I can’t even see it either because I just feel it to be able to buy a fifty-dollar shoe instead of a much expensive one and utilise the remainder of what I possess to create bigger chances for my success or the success of others in my village, nation or world.

It is focusing on invisible poverty alone and, therefore, addressing the first question that can have some of us win a financial journey starting from the very little despite myths about wealth creation.

The biased human logic

Knowing what to address between visible and invisible poverty is great. It is the best thing to do in wealth creation as a process. Human logic, however, is biased. For example, it takes what’s bad as what bad people do instead of what people do and do it through very bad means, and therefore bad is considered as lack of purity to the would instead of lack of purity to the mind which drives anything. As it is biased. Poverty automatically becomes what’s visible instead of visible.

When we can’t see a certain thing it doesn’t mean that thing doesn’t matter. We need to capture what can only be felt and visualise what we can do about it. We may need to stop seeing things to discover bigger things in life. It is when we bring in that sense of discovery that we can discover what we are capable of with what we are and what we have not what we can be capable of once we come to possess the things we currently don’t.

We are not invited to live our lives; simply, we are entitled to live them; and if one of us can’t do that properly no one will.

Because of our biased logic mindful to only visible poverty instead of invisible poverty we: